Achilles tendon rupture

Achilles Rupture - Physiopedia

During the physical exam, your doctor will inspect your lower leg for tenderness and swelling. Your doctor might be able to feel a gap in your tendon if it has ruptured completely.

The doctor might ask you to kneel on a chair or lie on your stomach with your feet hanging over the end of the exam table. He or she might then squeeze your calf muscle to see if your foot will automatically flex. If it doesn’t, you probably have ruptured your Achilles tendon.

If there’s a question about the extent of your Achilles tendon injury — whether it’s completely or only partially ruptured — your doctor might order an ultrasound or MRI scan. These painless procedures create images of the tissues of your body.

Treatment for physical exam

Treatment for a ruptured Achilles tendon often depends on your age, activity level and the severity of your injury. In general, younger and more active people, particularly athletes, tend to choose surgery to repair a completely ruptured Achilles tendon, while older people are more likely to opt for nonsurgical treatment.

Recent studies, however, have shown fairly equal effectiveness of both surgical and nonsurgical management.

Nonsurgical treatment

This approach typically involves:

  • Resting the tendon by using crutches
  • Applying ice to the area
  • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers
  • Keeping the ankle from moving for the first few weeks, usually with a walking boot with heel wedges or a cast, with the foot flexed down

Nonoperative treatment avoids the risks associated with surgery, such as infection.

However, a nonsurgical approach might increase your chances of re-rupture and recovery can take longer, although recent studies indicate favorable outcomes in people treated nonsurgically if they start rehabilitation with weight bearing early.

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